Fashion

Coordinating Swimwear: The Rash Guard

swim_design
Planning the layout

Rashguards used to be just for surfers, but they have earned a place as a required item in anyone’s complete activewear wardrobe. They are especially popular as children’s wear. Any parent can tell you that they protect delicate skin from the sun way better than sunscreen, which wears off before you know it. It’s easier to pull on a rashguard than to put on sunscreen and they are sporty and fun for men, women and kids.

Like everything else, fit matters!  Personally, I usually end up buying oversized, sloppy rashguards because the ones that are in standard sizes are both too tight and too loose at the same time. Sound familiar? Spandex stretches, so even if it doesn’t fit, you can usually pull one on anyway. But the results and comfort leave a lot to be desired.

ultra_stretch_test
Sample / test of seam finish

The solution? Sew your own, of course!

I had enough fabric left from my maillot to make front and back pieces for a color-blocked rashguard.  So not only could I make a rashguard that fits, I could coordinate it with my swimsuit.  Fancy!  I got a yard of solid plum lycra for the contrast. I chose a pattern from McCall’s with a raglan sleeve and sleeve length and overall length variations.  If you want to make Mommy and me looks, there is also a matching kids’ pattern available.

rg_inside
View of the inside, showing wooly nylon thread

Of course, you don’t have to do things exactly the way the pattern tells you to.  I cut the pieces for the long length, long-sleeve version. Instead of doing the blocking the pattern suggested, I made it solid plum overall with only a floral front and back panel.

The top went together quickly.  In some ways, sewing the stretchy spandex was simpler than doing the same type of shirt in jersey.  I’m not sure why, but it seemed to feed more evenly than cotton jersey and attaching the the neck band was more forgiving as well.  I continued to use a stretch needle and the walking foot for all regular machine work. But, most of the sewing was done on the serger set up for a 3-thread super-stretch overlock. I threaded the lower looper with wooly nylon and the needles with regular polyester thread. I was pleasantly surprised to find that I only needed to loosen the tension a little bit on the lower looper to make a nice even edge finish.  I love the softness of the wooly nylon against the skin.  I have read that wooly polyester is a better choice, because it stands up to machine mashing better.  I plan on getting some and seeing for myself, but for now, nylon it is!

threads_on_serger
Thread conserving spool setup

This was a great opportunity to finally use my new serger’s coverstitch function.  I only had one spool of plum-colored thread, so to make two lines of matching topstitching, I threaded one needle with the spool and the other one with the bobbin thread. I kept going with the purple wooly nylon on the inside.  I think it looks pretty nice, although I wish I had found a closer match for the wooly nylon.  I used the coverstitch for all of the hems and for a nice neckband finish. (Okay, they are a little wobbly, but it’s fine for a first effort).

I really like it. Now that I know how easy it is, I am going to make matching rashguards for all of my future swimwear.

Coming soon – working with plaids and a return to wovens.

coverstitch_examples
Coverstitch tests.  Upper sample shows flat result from decreased cover stitch tension

 

 

 

 

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